The Taiwan Dillemma: De-escalation of Conflicts or Democracy Above All?

Image by Jon Flobrant

Debate:

Should we defend the demoracy of Taiwan even it risks the war with China or loss of Taiwanese lives?

Although, the recent China-Lithuania friction over whether or not Taiwan should enjoy the status of a sovereign state make many of us eager to show our supports toward Taiwanese democracy, but we don't see why we should risk the escalation of war in Far East and our already frigale relationship with China by steer away from the 'One China Principle', which is the guiding principles of a proper framework for the international community to maintain the peace on both sides of Taiwan Straight. Our approaches with both the mainland China and Taiwan must be based on three realities: the recognition of China returning to world stage as a great power; a relatively good relation with China that serves as the corner stone of peace; the Chinese-Taiwanese relations not being used as a tool by interventionist policies.

  Last year, the U.S. election followed by blame-shifting from the virus-ravaged States and the turmoil at Capital Hill has caused a heavy headwind for China serving American desire to stay the one and only superpower. But, sovereignty in the 21st century means having alternatives and we all have high interest in having different suppliers to stay somehow independent and sovereign. Instead of provoking China, we must not to risk the escalation of war at a time that Europe is already entragled in one with Russia, we also need China's full engagement in essential global challenges like the climate change, global campaign against the corona virus and post pandemic recovery of economy. We are not freigntened about the fact that every nation has its right to follow its national interest, which for China are focused on economics. China is coming back into its role as a greatpower and it is better to seek peaceful co-existence with her and benefit from its development than sounding the war drums.